Home » Wallace, or the Life and Acts of Sir William Wallace of Ellerslie, Vol. 2 by Minstrel Henry
Wallace, or the Life and Acts of Sir William Wallace of Ellerslie, Vol. 2 Minstrel Henry

Wallace, or the Life and Acts of Sir William Wallace of Ellerslie, Vol. 2

Minstrel Henry

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331931645
Paperback
472 pages
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Excerpt from Wallace, or the Life and Acts of Sir William Wallace of Ellerslie, Vol. 2This account, as it merely respects the recitation of his poem, is not inconsistent with what Henry himself says, when he asserts his independence in theMoreExcerpt from Wallace, or the Life and Acts of Sir William Wallace of Ellerslie, Vol. 2This account, as it merely respects the recitation of his poem, is not inconsistent with what Henry himself says, when he asserts his independence in the composition of it, and declares that the motive by which he was chiefly actuated, was a patriotic desire to preserve the memory of the illustrious deeds of Wallace from oblivion.All worthi men at redys this rurall dyt,Blaym nocht the buk, set I be wnperfyt.I suld hawe thank, sen I nocht trawaill spard-For my laubour na man hecht me reward-Na charge I had off king nor othir lord-Gret harm I thocht his gud deid suld be smord.I haiff said her ner as the process gais-And fenyeid nocht for frendschip nor for fais.Costis herfor was no man bond to me-In this sentence I had na will to be, &c.Wallace, B. XI. v. 1432.Mr. Pinkerton has given 1470 as the date when it may be supposed that Henry appeared in the character of an author. It is generally admitted, indeed, that Major was born in the year 1469. Henry, by reason of his blindness, could not himself have written his poetical effusions- and it may reasonably be supposed, from his dependent and ambulatory mode of life, that he could not employ an amanuensis properly qualified for the task. Hence may we account for the obscurity, and even for the apparent absurdity, of some passages in his work. Bating these imperfections, his descriptions are often so vivid, and his images so just, that he undoubtedly ranks higher, as a poetical writer, than either Barbour or Wyntown, who had all the advantages of a liberal education, such, at least, as the times could afford.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.